Mountain West Official Statement Regarding Play at the End of First Overtime in the Boise State at Colorado State Men's Basketball Contest

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - With the score tied and 0.8 second(s) remaining in the first overtime of last night's Boise State at Colorado State game, a Boise State player made a three-point basket which would have resulted in a victory for Boise State. In accordance with NCAA Basketball Playing Rules 11, Article 4, Section 2, Article 1 c 1; Article 4, Section 3, Article 1 a 1, and; standard protocol, the officials went to the scorer's table to determine whether the game clock malfunctioned or whether a timing mistake occurred in starting or stopping the game clock. The game officials determined the game clock did not start when the ball was first touched by the Boise State player.

The officials then utilized the digital stopwatch embedded within the video overlay in the instant replay system to determine how many tenths of a second expired between the time the Boise State player touched the ball and the moment he released the shot. After reviewing the video and stopwatch combination several times, it was determined the shot was not released within an 0.8 second(s) time frame and thus did not count.

The Mountain West Coordinator of Officials, the NCAA National Coordinator of Officials, the NCAA Secretary-Rules Editor and the MW Conference office have reviewed the play extensively and consulted on the administration of the video review. It has been determined the game officials executed the appropriate protocol and made the correct call.

It is standard procedure to review potential game-ending baskets and the game officials came to their determination utilizing the official video and embedded clock technology within the approved multi-camera capture instant replay system. The video clip from that system which was reviewed by the game officials can be found here: https://youtu.be/6eJsPC_ca3A

It is clear 1.2 to 1.3 seconds elapsed from the time the player touched the ball to the time the shot was released, and that the game clock did not start for several tenths of a second after the initial touch. Thus, the basket did not count - regardless of what was ultimately reflected on the game clock or what other unofficial video replays may appear to indicate.

Finally, some question has been raised regarding the preceding play, where Colorado State turned the ball over. The Mountain West has also reviewed that play utilizing the official replay system and determined the clock stopped correctly at 0.8 second(s) once the official blew his whistle for the backcourt violation. His whistle stopped the clock automatically via the Precision Timing System at that instant.